Myths about the Application Process and Admissions Officers

By the time you get to the application, the hard work is done.
Admission committees can't tell if the applicant wrote the essays themselves.
Be modest when writing your application and resume.
Colleges are looking for well-rounded students.
You want to get recommendations from teachers who have given you A's.
A great interview can make up for a so-so academic record.
The Common App makes applying to lots of schools just as easy as applying to a few.
The best time to visit colleges is after you have been admitted.
Don't tie yourself down to one school by applying early decision.
No college will take the time to look at your Facebook page.

Myths about Grades and Standardized Testing

Your SAT/ACT score is the most important thing in your application.
You have to have a certain standardized test score to be admitted.
It's better to get good grades than take challenging courses.
You can't get into a selective college if you did poorly in ninth and tenth grade.
A lot of out-of-class activities will compensate for poor grades.
Freshman year grades don’t matter.
The best way to study is to take practice tests.
The ACT is not accepted by some universities.
Some testing dates are harder than others.

Myths about Financial Aid

Our family earns too much money to qualify for financial aid.
We can save a lot of money if our child lives at home during college.
Private schools are far too expensive for us to consider.
Financial Aid is complex. I need to hire an expert to do this for me…which costs money!
I need to go to the most prestigious school, regardless of cost. It will pay off in the long run.
There is no point in applying for scholarships. I am not a straight-A student.

More Myths

You need to decide on my career before you can choose a college.
Big colleges are best if you haven't decided on a major field.
Your life will be ruined if you don't get admitted to your first choice college.
Liberal arts colleges do not have good science programs.
You should go to the most prestigious college to which you are admitted.
Residence halls are simply a place to sleep.

Have a myth?  Contact us and pass it along.  We’ll debunk it.